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Monthly Archives: March 2014

Went to visit the Gagosian Gallery, Britannia Street, London earlier this week to see  George Bazelitz’s  paintings.  The exhibition was comprised of a whole series of enormous canvases showing essentially the same motif, all painted in 2013.  There were also a series of  more drawing like works, same motif and hung in series.  A very stunning and enjoyable exhibition traversing the boundary of figurative and abstract painting – reminiscent of de Kooning.

Mark Brown reviews the show for the Guardian newspaper. One of the comments in this article claims that Bazelitz said “Women don’t paint very well. It’s a fact,”.  I found this quote in the Independent newspaper and now feel a bit hostile.  I bet Bazelitz does’nt have to do the shopping, cleaning, childcare and cooking!  Besides something as SUBJECTIVE as the quality of  painting is NOT FACTUAL.

Then went to see Renaissance Impressions at the Royal Academy of Arts. Truely impressive work, these guys could really draw figures!  No women’s work here!

Alistair Smart reviews this exhibition for the Telegraph newspaper.  Many of the works on display are owned by George Bazelitz.  My favourite image was a small print of St Andrew? carrying a wooden cross.  The simple image concentrated on the struggling figure trying to carry a very large wooden cross.  The figure brilliantly conveyed the weight of the cross – genius!

Last night was a full moon.  Pond full of croaking, mating frogs.  Now the pond is full of frogs spawn – yeuch!  Re-reading Nihil Unbound by Ray Brassier.

Here is  some information about x-ray images of stars.

Visit to Royal Academy Interims exhibition.  Unfortunately the exhibition was eminently forgettable except for Maria de Lima’s paintings and Caroline Abbots star circle.

Some of James Turell’s light pieces were also exhibited at this venue.  Large backlit panels with different colours and tones fading in and out.  They were reminiscent of  Mark Rothko’s paintings.

Current painting:

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Lost in space

Working from a false colour x-ray picture of the Pleiades (courtesy of NASA) but getting lost in the image.

Why does my painting look better with all the fresh oil paint rubbed off?

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Lost in Space, eroded.

I think it’s because I started to overwork the painting too soon!

Messier 90 is blueshifted.  Its moving towards the Earth.

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Drawing from photograph of galaxy M90 (c.55 million light years from Earth) using fossil carbonized wood, collected from Herne Bay, Kent (c55m million years old)
FINISHED!

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Drawing from photograph of galaxy M90 (c.55 million light years from Earth) using fossil carbonized wood, collected from Herne Bay, Kent (c55m million years old)

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Carbonized fossil wood collected from Herne Bay, Kent. Not in situ, but probably derived from the Upnor beds, c. 55 million years old.

 

Zizek and Politics, a critical introduction by Matthew Sharpe and Geoff M. Boucher.  The first time I read this book I didn’t glean much from it as I was finding the terminology difficult.  My second reading was slower and more careful.   Zizek and Politics introduces Zizek as a doctor of Philosophy and Psychoanalyst and charts and explains Zizeks evolution from an earlier Radical-Democrat to a later Revolutionary-Vanguardist stance.  Sharpe and Boucher also critique Zizeks’ evolving reasoning and theories.  This book is an excellent attempt to understand how Zizek operates and how his thinking evolved.  Bye bye Post-modernism………………….and good riddance!

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Zizek and Politics a Critical Introduction

Visit to the Martin Creed exhibition at The Hayward Gallery.  I was very taken with his ‘Mothers‘ neon rotating sign.  The effect of this work definitely struck a chord.  Overall though I’ve decided that his work is consistently inconsistent.  Writing in The Guardian, Adrian Searle does a good review of Martin Creed’s exhibition.

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Balloon filled area, Creed’s  ‘Half the Air in a Given Space’

Still reading Zizek and Politics, a critical introduction by Matthew Sharpe and Geoff M. Boucher.  Review & resume to come later.